Little Known Black Herstory Facts

 

1960s: Joan Dorsey was the first African-American flight attendant hired to work for American Airlines.:
Joan Dorsey

1960s: Joan Dorsey was the first African-American flight attendant hired to work for American Airlines. Pinterest

 

Dr. May Edward Chinn (April 15, 1896 – December 1, 1980) was an African-American woman physician. She was the first African-American woman to graduate from Bellevue Hospital Medical College and the first African-American woman to intern at Harlem Hospital. In her private practice, she provided care for patients who would not otherwise receive treatment due to racism or classism. She performed pioneering research on cancer, helping to develop the Pap smear test for cervical cancer:
Dr. May Edward Chinn

Dr. May Edward Chinn (April 15, 1896 – December 1, 1980) was an African-American woman physician. She was the first African-American woman to graduate from Bellevue Hospital Medical College and the first African-American woman to intern at Harlem Hospital. In her private practice, she provided care for patients who would not otherwise receive treatment due to racism or classism. She performed pioneering research on cancer, helping to develop the Pap smear test for cervical cancer. Read more here.

 

Diana Fletcher was a Black Indian who lived with the Kiowa:
Diana Fletcher

Diana Fletcher was a Black Indian who lived with the Kiowa. Found on Flickr.com. Read more about Black Indians here

Lenora Branch Fulani - USA: Fulani was the first African American to achieve ballot access in all fifty states and received more votes for President in a U.S. general election than any other woman in history. #womens #history #black #women in #politics:

Lenora Branch Fulani

Lenora Branch Fulani – USA: Fulani was the first African American to achieve ballot access in all fifty states and received more votes for President in a U.S. general election than any other woman in history. #womens #history #black #women in #politics. Read more here.

 

Ursula Burns - CEO Xerox. First woman to succeed another woman and first African American woman CEO of a Fortune company and:
Ursula Burns

Ursula Burns – CEO Xerox. First woman to succeed another woman and first African American woman CEO of a Fortune company. Read more here.

 

Jane C. Wright - African-American pioneer in chemotherapy and anti-cancer chemical research. Appointed head of the Cancer Research Foundation at a mere 33 years old, associate professor at NYU, associatee dean at New York Medical College, and first female president of the New York Cancer Society by the end of her career in the 1980s.:
Dr. Jane C. Wright

 

Dr. Jane C. Wright – African-American pioneer in chemotherapy and anti-cancer chemical research. Appointed head of the Cancer Research Foundation at a mere 33 years old, associate professor at NYU, associate dean at New York Medical College, and first female president of the New York Cancer Society by the end of her career in the 1980s. Read more here.

Janet Harmon Waterford Bragg, 1932. Janet Bragg was a pioneer female African American pilot whose leadership in black pilot organizations in the 1930s created opportunities for others. She is seen here sitting on a fence at Harlem Airport, Chicago. SI-79-13664:
Janet Harmon Waterford Bragg

Janet Harmon Waterford Bragg, 1932. Janet Bragg was a pioneer female African American pilot whose leadership in black pilot organizations in the 1930s created opportunities for others. She is seen here sitting on a fence at Harlem Airport, Chicago. SI-79-13664. From Pinterest.

 

Rosalind G. Brewer was made the CEO and President of Sam's Club in early 2012, making her both the first woman and the first African American to be made a chief officer in the company. Her rise through the ranks is also notable — she started with the company just a few years earlier in 2006 as a company scientist and rose through the executive ranks.:
Rosalind G. Brewer

 

Rosalind G. Brewer was made the CEO and President of Sam’s Club in early 2012, making her both the first woman and the first African-American to be made a chief officer in the company. Her rise through the ranks is also notable — she started with the company just a few years earlier in 2006 as a company scientist and rose through the executive ranks. Read more here.

 

Americans of African Descent are ""worthy of every right and privilege granted to other citizens of this United States of America" - Delilah L. Beasley, 1919." She was the first African Descent woman to write regularly for an integrated daily newspaper, the Oakland Tribune in 1923. She was instrumental in persuading the national press to stop using the words “*arkie” and “*igger” and began to capitalize the “N” in Negro and became an outspoken activist for civil rights.:
Delilah Beasley

Americans of African Descent are “”worthy of every right and privilege granted to other citizens of this United States of America” – Delilah L. Beasley, 1919.” She was the first African Descent woman to write regularly for an integrated daily newspaper, the Oakland Tribune in 1923. She was instrumental in persuading the national press to stop using the words “*arkie” and “*igger” and began to capitalize the “N” in Negro and became an outspoken activist for civil rights. Read more here.

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